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FIFA rejects Chile appeal over Ecuador’s 2022 World Cup

FIFA has rejected Chile’s request to take Ecuador’s place at the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, the international governing body of football stated on Friday.

FIFA rejected Chile’s claim that Byron Castillo, who played for Ecuador in tournament qualifying and made eight appearances, was actually a Colombian and hence ineligible to compete.

In accordance with football’s legal regulations, FIFA’s appeal judges “deemed that on the basis of the documents given, the player was to be treated as retaining permanent Ecuadorian nationality,” according to the organization.

Ecuador will continue to play in Qatar because of the decision, which upholds a FIFA disciplinary decision from June and will probably be appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). On Nov. 20, they will play the hosts in the World Cup opener in Doha. Group A also includes Senegal and the Netherlands.

Chile can still file a legal challenge, though.

The Chilean Football Federation has declared its intention to appeal FIFA’s decision to sport’s highest court, the CAS in Lausanne, Switzerland, which has the power to schedule an expedited hearing and decision prior to the World Cup.

Jorge Yunge, general secretary of the Chilean Football Federation, declared that “this is a terrible day for football and for the legitimacy of the system.”

“A player who helped Ecuador qualify for the FIFA World Cup admitted to the football world that he was actually born in Colombia and that he obtained an Ecuadorian passport by using fake information. It makes sense why he declined to take part in the FIFA hearing. What does the appeals committee’s continued inaction in the face of all this indicate about them?

There have been enough unjustified delays and postponements in this case that we will, of course, refer it to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. We also urge the appeal committee to deliver the decision’s justifications quickly.

Castillo should not have represented Ecuador, according to Chile, which claimed to have proof to that effect.

After the World Cup draw was conducted on April 1 and after FIFA and the Qatari organizers sold thousands of tickets and lodging units to Ecuador fans, Chile began to prepare its case.

As a lawyer, Eduardo Carlezzo declared, “I have never witnessed an injustice like this one in my whole career.” Carlezzo is representing the Chilean Football Federation.

“There are a ton of documentation that, by themselves, establish the player’s Colombian birthplace beyond a shadow of a doubt. Furthermore, everyone heard his confession, which was made during a formal investigation conducted by the Ecuadorian Federation itself. The player also made fun of the system by skipping a hearing, but nothing of it had any impact. What more is required?

“It is obvious that nothing we could ever submit would be sufficient to support the claim. A sad day for fair play and football. Cheating is acceptable, that much is evident. We’ll make a CAS appeal.”

Chile would have moved to the fourth automatic qualification spot in the South American qualifying group had Ecuador forfeited all eight of the games Castillo played. Ecuador would have been eliminated from the competition.

When a state government has granted players citizenship, they are still eligible for the national team, according to a provision of FIFA’s legal regulations.

The statutes provide that “Any person holding a permanent nationality which is not dependent on residence in a particular country is eligible to play for the representative teams of the association of that country.”

Only the three judges were present at the appeal hearing on Thursday, which was conducted electronically from Zurich. Neil Eggleston, an American who served as White House counsel during Barack Obama’s second term, was the chief judge in charge of the case.

Rarely does the FIFA appeals committee overturn a decision made by the disciplinary committee of the football organization.

In two consecutive World Cup qualifying matches, Chile has complained against an opponent’s player.

Bolivia lost two games in its World Cup qualification group after using an ineligible player as a late substitute. Regarding the Bolivian defender Nelson Cabrera, who was born in Paraguay and had previously represented Paraguay’s national team, FIFA received objections from Chile and Peru.

Bolivia was unsuccessful in its appeal at the CAS, which ruled that FIFA was within its rights to look into the matter even if the protests weren’t lodged until weeks after the games had taken place.

Chile ultimately suffered from that case. Peru won the intercontinental playoff and went on to the 2018 tournament in Russia thanks to the three extra points that were handed to it, which put it ahead of Chile.

FIFA then drafted more stringent regulations for the 2022 World Cup, mandating that all competitors in qualifying matches provide a “genuine permanent international passport” for match officials to examine.

FIFA dismisses Chile’s appeal about Ecuador’s World Cup spot in 2022.
4 minutes ago Solo, Han
FIFA has rejected Chile’s request to take Ecuador’s place at the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, the international governing body of football stated on Friday.

FIFA rejected Chile’s claim that Byron Castillo, who played for Ecuador in tournament qualifying and made eight appearances, was actually a Colombian and hence ineligible to compete.

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In accordance with football’s legal regulations, FIFA’s appeal judges “deemed that on the basis of the documents given, the player was to be treated as retaining permanent Ecuadorian nationality,” according to the organization.

Ecuador will continue to play in Qatar because of the decision, which upholds a FIFA disciplinary decision from June and will probably be appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). On Nov. 20, they will play the hosts in the World Cup opener in Doha. Group A also includes Senegal and the Netherlands.

Chile can still file a legal challenge, though.

The Chilean Football Federation has declared its intention to appeal FIFA’s decision to sport’s highest court, the CAS in Lausanne, Switzerland, which has the power to schedule an expedited hearing and decision prior to the World Cup.

Jorge Yunge, general secretary of the Chilean Football Federation, declared that “this is a terrible day for football and for the legitimacy of the system.”

“A player who helped Ecuador qualify for the FIFA World Cup admitted to the football world that he was actually born in Colombia and that he obtained an Ecuadorian passport by using fake information. It makes sense why he declined to take part in the FIFA hearing. What does the appeals committee’s continued inaction in the face of all this indicate about them?

There have been enough unjustified delays and postponements in this case that we will, of course, refer it to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. We also urge the appeal committee to deliver the decision’s justifications quickly.

Castillo should not have represented Ecuador, according to Chile, which claimed to have proof to that effect.

After the World Cup draw was conducted on April 1 and after FIFA and the Qatari organizers sold thousands of tickets and lodging units to Ecuador fans, Chile began to prepare its case.

As a lawyer, Eduardo Carlezzo declared, “I have never witnessed an injustice like this one in my whole career.” Carlezzo is representing the Chilean Football Federation.

“There are a ton of documentation that, by themselves, establish the player’s Colombian birthplace beyond a shadow of a doubt. Furthermore, everyone heard his confession, which was made during a formal investigation conducted by the Ecuadorian Federation itself. The player also made fun of the system by skipping a hearing, but nothing of it had any impact. What more is required?

“It is obvious that nothing we could ever submit would be sufficient to support the claim. A sad day for fair play and football. Cheating is acceptable, that much is evident. We’ll make a CAS appeal.”

Chile would have moved to the fourth automatic qualification spot in the South American qualifying group had Ecuador forfeited all eight of the games Castillo played. Ecuador would have been eliminated from the competition.

When a state government has granted players citizenship, they are still eligible for the national team, according to a provision of FIFA’s legal regulations.

The statutes provide that “Any person holding a permanent nationality which is not dependent on residence in a particular country is eligible to play for the representative teams of the association of that country.”

Only the three judges were present at the appeal hearing on Thursday, which was conducted electronically from Zurich. Neil Eggleston, an American who served as White House counsel during Barack Obama’s second term, was the chief judge in charge of the case.

Rarely does the FIFA appeals committee overturn a decision made by the disciplinary committee of the football organization.

In two consecutive World Cup qualifying matches, Chile has complained against an opponent’s player.

Bolivia lost two games in its World Cup qualification group after using an ineligible player as a late substitute. Regarding the Bolivian defender Nelson Cabrera, who was born in Paraguay and had previously represented Paraguay’s national team, FIFA received objections from Chile and Peru.

Bolivia was unsuccessful in its appeal at the CAS, which ruled that FIFA was within its rights to look into the matter even if the protests weren’t lodged until weeks after the games had taken place.

Chile ultimately suffered from that case. Peru won the intercontinental playoff and went on to the 2018 tournament in Russia thanks to the three extra points that were handed to it, which put it ahead of Chile.

FIFA then drafted more stringent regulations for the 2022 World Cup, mandating that all competitors in qualifying matches provide a “genuine permanent international passport” for match officials to examine.

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