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The top cocoa grower claims that farmers are content with the increased price.

increased price of cocoa

The top cocoa grower claims that farmers are content with the increased price.

The new cocoa price that the government has set has been accepted by farmers in the Volta/Oti regions, according to Nana Kwame Abass, the region’s chief cocoa grower.

Although farmers expected to get GH 1,000 per bag, he claimed that government measures including the distribution of plantain suckers, cocoa nurseries, mass spraying, distribution of wellington boots, fungicide, and others had brought down the price to GH 800.

However, Nana Abass stated in a speech to a gathering in Hohoe that they were hoping for an increase in the succeeding years.

He stated that if it weren’t for the government incentives, the cocoa grower would have earned more money than what the government and other parties had agreed upon.

He claimed that the COVID-19 pandemic and other issues prevented them from receiving an increase last year, thus they did not anticipate the GH140 cedis increase from the previous price of GH660.

He urged farmers to keep up their hard work to produce more instead of getting discouraged by the new pricing.

Production in the regions is being impacted, according to Nana Abass, by the smuggling of cocoa to neighboring Togo and Ivory Coast.

He urged the COCOBOD and the government to ensure fast payment to farmers in order to prevent farmers from selling their produce to foreigners who already had cash in hand.

Nana Abass urged the COCOBOD to keep an eye on the individuals or business responsible for buying cocoa from the farmers since they might also be behind the smuggling.

The Minister of Agriculture, Dr. Owusu Afriyie Akoto, stated last month that a bag of 64 kg of cocoa was now being sold for GHC 800.

The new cocoa price issued by the government is good, according to Mr. Wisdom Delali Amexame, Administrator and Intelligence Manager, COCOBOD.

He pointed out that 89% of the proceeds from the syndicated loan were going to the farmers, with the remaining funds going toward building cocoa roads, fertilisers, chemicals, and staff welfare.

Despite government efforts, some farmers, according to Mr. Amexame, continue to smuggle cocoa into nearby nations.

Despite claims that the price of cocoa was greater in Togo, he noted that there had been no interventions there, unlike what had happened in Ghana.

He mentioned that computerized scales were in use to stop buyers of cocoa beans from farmers from making unauthorized modifications.

According to Mr. Seth Kpabitey, Quality Control Officer at COCOBOD, one of COCOBOD’s initiatives to ensure that the product meets both international standards and customer expectations is to ensure that the beans are completely dried, properly fermented, mold- and insect-free, and free of stored-product insects.

He claimed that the cocoa value chain was guaranteed and certified, with clear, easy-to-trace paths, and COCOBOD confirming all chemicals used.

Mr. Kpabitey stated that farmers in the two regions deserve praise for following instructions and providing the country with high-quality cocoa.

According to Mr. Linus Kofi Fiakeye, Regional Manager in charge of the Division of Cocoa Health and Extension, farmer groups had been formed to inform and prepare them to assure quality yields.

In addition to mass spraying and crediting fertilisers to farmers, Mr. Fiakeye said they also concentrated on cutting off disease farms, overage farms, trimming, and seedling distribution. He urged farmers to take use of the available interventions to increase production and income.

Because they were not paid for more than a month after buying the commodity, Mr. Samuel Fato, District Chief Cocoa Farmer, Papase, claimed that farmers tended to smuggle their cocoa. He asked for timely supply and sufficient chemicals.

In order to reduce the threat of cocoa smuggling in the Municipality and the region, Mr. Emmanuel Senyo Agbenyo, speaking on behalf of the Hohoe Municipal Chief Executive, promised the Assembly’s help in working with the security agencies.

He claimed that despite obstacles, the administration was dedicated to ensuring farmers’ welfare and implementing policies that would improve their situation.

In order to work with COCOBOD and farmers to apprehend cocoa smugglers, the Ghana Police Service, Ghana Immigration Service, and the Customs Excise and Preventive Service all committed their cooperation.

Despite the large number of unauthorized routes in the Municipality, Assistant Superintendent of Immigration (ASI) Seth Amoako Danquah, Wli Border Post, highlighted that they will continue to coordinate with other security agencies to step up patrols on the routes to stop cocoa smuggling.

He asserted that the youth were primarily to blame and asked the farmers to keep an eye out for the youth’s actions in their neighborhoods.

The top cocoa grower claims that farmers are content with the increased price.

The new cocoa price that the government has set has been accepted by farmers in the Volta/Oti regions, according to Nana Kwame Abass, the region’s chief cocoa grower.

Although farmers expected to get GH 1,000 per bag, he claimed that government measures including the distribution of plantain suckers, cocoa nurseries, mass spraying, distribution of wellington boots, fungicide, and others had brought down the price to GH 800.

However, Nana Abass stated in a speech to a gathering in Hohoe that they were hoping for an increase in the succeeding years.

He stated that if it weren’t for the government incentives, the cocoa grower would have earned more money than what the government and other parties had agreed upon.

He claimed that the COVID-19 pandemic and other issues prevented them from receiving an increase last year, thus they did not anticipate the GH140 cedis increase from the previous price of GH660.

He urged farmers to keep up their hard work to produce more instead of getting discouraged by the new pricing.

Production in the regions is being impacted, according to Nana Abass, by the smuggling of cocoa to neighboring Togo and Ivory Coast.

He urged the COCOBOD and the government to ensure fast payment to farmers in order to prevent farmers from selling their produce to foreigners who already had cash in hand.

Nana Abass urged the COCOBOD to keep an eye on the individuals or business responsible for buying cocoa from the farmers since they might also be behind the smuggling.

The Minister of Agriculture, Dr. Owusu Afriyie Akoto, stated last month that a bag of 64 kg of cocoa was now being sold for GHC 800.

The new cocoa price issued by the government is good, according to Mr. Wisdom Delali Amexame, Administrator and Intelligence Manager, COCOBOD.

He pointed out that 89% of the proceeds from the syndicated loan were going to the farmers, with the remaining funds going toward building cocoa roads, fertilisers, chemicals, and staff welfare.

Despite government efforts, some farmers, according to Mr. Amexame, continue to smuggle cocoa into nearby nations.

Despite claims that the price of cocoa was greater in Togo, he noted that there had been no interventions there, unlike what had happened in Ghana.

He mentioned that computerized scales were in use to stop buyers of cocoa beans from farmers from making unauthorized modifications.

According to Mr. Seth Kpabitey, Quality Control Officer at COCOBOD, one of COCOBOD’s initiatives to ensure that the product meets both international standards and customer expectations is to ensure that the beans are completely dried, properly fermented, mold- and insect-free, and free of stored-product insects.

He claimed that the cocoa value chain was guaranteed and certified, with clear, easy-to-trace paths, and COCOBOD confirming all chemicals used.

Mr. Kpabitey stated that farmers in the two regions deserve praise for following instructions and providing the country with high-quality cocoa.

According to Mr. Linus Kofi Fiakeye, Regional Manager in charge of the Division of Cocoa Health and Extension, farmer groups had been formed to inform and prepare them to assure quality yields.

In addition to mass spraying and crediting fertilisers to farmers, Mr. Fiakeye said they also concentrated on cutting off disease farms, overage farms, trimming, and seedling distribution. He urged farmers to take use of the available interventions to increase production and income.

Because they were not paid for more than a month after buying the commodity, Mr. Samuel Fato, District Chief Cocoa Farmer, Papase, claimed that farmers tended to smuggle their cocoa. He asked for timely supply and sufficient chemicals.

In order to reduce the threat of cocoa smuggling in the Municipality and the region, Mr. Emmanuel Senyo Agbenyo, speaking on behalf of the Hohoe Municipal Chief Executive, promised the Assembly’s help in working with the security agencies.

He claimed that despite obstacles, the administration was dedicated to ensuring farmers’ welfare and implementing policies that would improve their situation.

In order to work with COCOBOD and farmers to apprehend cocoa smugglers, the Ghana Police Service, Ghana Immigration Service, and the Customs Excise and Preventive Service all committed their cooperation.

Despite the large number of unauthorized routes in the Municipality, Assistant Superintendent of Immigration (ASI) Seth Amoako Danquah, Wli Border Post, highlighted that they will continue to coordinate with other security agencies to step up patrols on the routes to stop cocoa smuggling.

He asserted that the youth were primarily to blame and asked the farmers to keep an eye out for the youth’s actions in their neighborhoods.

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